>THE KASE FOR KINDLES

Posted: July 2, 2011 in Uncategorized

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No reviews at the moment because I am half way through one excellent police procedural, and three quarters of the way through an exciting and intelligent thriller.

I don’t normally read two books at once, as that would require too much effort from the old brain box. But when we were ready to depart on a short visit to friends [a teasing clue to their location is in the photo] I decided that although I was really enjoying reading the bulky paperback of Frozen Moment by Camilla Ceder perhaps it was too big to carry.


I took my Kindle instead because:

1] It weighed less and fits into a bag more easily.
2] I have the version with a light, which means that if I could not sleep in a strange bed I would be able to read.
3] The fact that the font size can be increased for easy reading is one of the major reasons I purchased a Kindle.

The book I started reading while away Devil’s Peak by Deon Meyer was recommended by Karen at Euro Crime some while ago, but when I looked at a paperback copy the font seemed miniscule. That made it an ideal choice for purchase on the Kindle.

So while I still like the feel of real books the Kindle is becoming essential for reading anything with small fonts.

Devil’s Peak won the Martin Beck Award in 2010 [for crime fiction translated into Swedish] beating books by Arnaldur Indridason and Reginald Hill.
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Comments
  1. >Norman – I admit; I haven't gotten a Kindle or other E-reader. I probably will at one point or another, and I most definitely see their appeal.

  2. >Margot-the other obvious reason for owning a Kindle is that if you go away for long holidays you can take an entire collection of books. Even though I have made quite a lot of flights I still can't read on planes, as it makes me feel sick, but I can understand people who regularly make long haul trips using Kindles.

  3. kathy d. says:

    >I still am a Luddite about Kindles, Facebook, iphones, ipods, etc. I am nearly always home so my computer is fine, and paper books are also fine with me.By the way, I was up all night reading Mistress in the Art of Death and loving it, although I am not usually a fan of historical fiction — crime or otherwise.But Diana Norman aka Ariana Franklin wrote this brilliantly. And her ideas, as presented by Adelia, were quite good.

  4. >Kathy I am a total Luddite myself. What amuses me is that my grandchildren can operate all this stuff in about 1/10th of the time it takes me to read the instructions. I agree Mistress of the Art of Death was brilliant, and Adelia a superb and original creation.

  5. kathy d. says:

    >And Diana Norman/Ariana Franklin made such good points through Adelia about the world as it was then obviously.My eyes have been opened about Cambridge in the 12th century, aspects of the Crusades I hadn't thought about, the widening of the world, travel, etc.A very enlightened, brilliant woman was the writer, and obviously, she was quite a humanitarian, with much respect for varying cultures, religions, people, etc.Not normally a fan of historical mysteries, I will convert for this series, a temporary conversion, but one nevertheless.

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