Agatha Christie book covers at Torquay Museum

Posted: October 16, 2012 in England, Golden Age of detective fiction

You have only a few weeks to view the exhibition at Torquay Museum of Agatha Christie book covers by Tom Adams which closes on the 2 November. The museum also houses  a permanent exhibition of Christie memorabilia, but these brilliant artwork covers are absolutely fascinating. Photography is allowed in that gallery [though not in the permanent Christie exhibition] so I thought I would share some with you.

A travel tip if you are going to Torquay from Exeter take the scenic coastal route through Dawlish, Teignmouth, Shaldon and Babbacombe. The sea and estuary views are well worth it and as you drive down into Torquay  the museum is on your right before you get to the busy part of the town.

I was a little surprised that the edition with what would be now be considered a very offensive title and cover dates from as late as 1975. 

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Comments
  1. Norman – Oh, this looks like a lovely exhibit! One of my life plans is to go to the Torquay Museum but ’til I can, I’m glad to at least see some of what’s available on your blog.

  2. Norman Price says:

    Margot, if you managed a visit it would be my pleasure to be your guide to the English Riviera and Agatha Christie’s home.

  3. Moira says:

    This sounds like a great exhibition, sorry to have missed it. I love the way Torquay celebrates its most famous daughter! I did a blog entry on the book with the name, and my research suggested that they kept usint the n-word right up to 1985 – as you say, hard to credit. http://clothesinbooks.blogspot.co.uk/2012/04/hunger-games-1939-ten-little-whats.html

  4. This book covers bring back such good memories of my young adulthood, discovering and reading Christie’s – a passion that turned into a collection of 1st editions that took decades to put together – but I still enjoy these paperback books – in fact there is a great book – The Art of Her Crimes by Tom Adams – that collects all these covers and gives insight and details into the hidden meanings within them. Fascinating stuff.

  5. This is really interesting, You are a very professional blogger. I’ve joined your feed and look ahead to in the hunt for more of your wonderful post. Also, I’ve shared your web site in my social networks

  6. Norman Price says:

    Thanks Moira, Torquay needs her most famous daughter to boost the economy. Hard to credit and a real shock in view of the fact that as students in the 1960s we would have lots of banter with the black students including my flatmate from Jamaica, but would never use that word. I never heard them use the word among themselves, but then they were intelligent.

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